Information for Patients, Lynch Syndrome

A dedicated service for the Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Improves Adherence with Molecular Testing for Lynch Syndrome


A DEDICATED SERVICE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEREDITARY COLORECTAL CANCER IMPROVES ADHERENCE WITH MOLECULAR TESTING FOR LYNCH SYNDROME

UEGW Amsterdam 2012

Leon Sergot, Sophie Stevens Poster, Fiona Turkes, Jason Smith, Kevin J. Monahan

The Family History of Bowel Cancer Clinic, West Middlesex University Hospital, London, United Kingdom

INTRODUCTION/OBJECTIVES:

Lynch Syndrome (LS) is responsible for 2-3% of colorectal cancer (CRC) which equates to ~1000 cases of CRC in the United Kingdom annually. Previous studies have demonstrated that in current practise less than 10% of these cases are identified as LS due to lack of appropriate testing. The international Bethesda guidelines were devised in 2002 to help identify such cases for tumour testing for the molecular features of LS, such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 expression, or DNA microsatellite instability analysis (MSI). These criteria include all individuals diagnosed

AIMS & METHODS:

We identified all new cases of CRC over 1 year before and after the establishment of a dedicated ‘Family History of Bowel Cancer Service’ in our hospital in March 2011. Adherence to the Bethesda guidelines was determined by examination of medical records and UK National Bowel Cancer Audit Programme (NBOCAP) data. Pathology reports were studied in patients aged 50-59 years at diagnosis for features consistent with MSI-type histology.

RESULTS:

In total, 198 cases of CRC were discussed at the CRC multidisciplinary meeting over a 2 year period. 12 individuals were diagnosed under the age of 50 years (~6%) consistent with Office of National Statistics (ONS) data. 31 patients were diagnosed between 50-59 years, of which 4 patients had MSI-type histology. A further 25 patients had a significant family history of CRC or a LS-related cancer diagnosed under 50 years. Therefore in total 41 patients fulfilled Bethesda criteria (20.7%). Between March 2010-March 2011 there were 18 such cases with only 1 patient’s tumour tested for the molecular features of LS (5.6%) compared to 19/23 cases tested in the subsequent year (82.6%), p value = 9.7e-7 (Chi=23.9956).  Six out of 20 (30%) cases tested demonstrated these molecular features with MSI and abnormal IHC, and are undergoing germline genetic testing.

CONCLUSION:

The establishment of a dedicated family history of bowel cancer service resulted in a significant improvement in testing individuals diagnosed with CRC with a possible diagnosis of LS. We recommend that this service be applied to identify such families throughout the United Kingdom to improve clinical pathways for these patients.

via Abstract View.

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About kjmonahan

Service lead for Family History of Bowel Cancer Clinic

Discussion

10 thoughts on “A dedicated service for the Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Improves Adherence with Molecular Testing for Lynch Syndrome

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