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New Bowel Cancer UK report on Lynch Syndrome


Families devastated by cancer as health bodies pass the buck

Our new findings reveal a shocking picture of delayed testing for diagnosis, poor management and unacceptable long waiting times for genetic testing for people diagnosed with Lynch syndrome – a genetic condition similar to the BRCA gene for people with a high risk of breast cancer.

  • We carried out a nationwide survey of people with Lynch syndrome.
  • An estimated 175,000 people have Lynch syndrome in the UK. Most people (95%) with Lynch syndrome do not know they have it because of a lack of systematic testing. If you have Lynch syndrome there is a 50% chance that your children, brothers and sisters also have the condition.
  • People with Lynch syndrome need to be identified, so they can be regularly monitored to reduce their risk of bowel cancer. In some cases the risk of developing bowel cancer from this inherited condition is as much as 80% and it also increases the risk of other cancers including ovarian cancer, stomach cancer and womb cancer.
    An estimated 1,100 cases of bowel cancer can be attributed to Lynch syndrome each year – many of them under the age of 50.
  • Currently people with Lynch syndrome are managed locally with mixed results across the country.  This means those at high risk who require coordinated, timely and high quality care in order to reduce and manage their risk of bowel cancer fail to receive it. There’s a lack of leadership locally and nationally, with no body or organisation taking responsibility to address these issues to improve the identification and management of this serious genetic condition. In the meantime whole families are being devastated by cancer.
  • The buck stops with the UK Health Ministers. We’ve started a petition calling on them to step in and take responsibility for identifying and managing people with Lynch syndrome by implementing the charity’s top three recommendations:
    • Develop a national registry of people identified as having Lynch syndrome. A registry could increase our understanding of the condition, including knowing how many people are affected & whether there are any regional differences in treatment, care and outcomes. Our survey found that 87% of respondents identified with Lynch syndrome would consent to be part of a genetics registry.
    • Establish a national surveillance programme to improve the management of people with the genetic condition. 49% of respondents to our survey experienced delays to their planned colonoscopy appointment date, with 78% waiting more than six weeks.
    • Comprehensive UK guidelines should be developed that set out best practice for the clinical management of people with Lynch syndrome.

51-year-old Caroline found out she had Lynch syndrome after she was diagnosed with bowel cancer.
“I was referred to a geneticist after chemotherapy, where I was diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. I had never heard of this, but it highlighted my family history. My whole family has been devastated by cancer. My mum died of ovarian cancer, her mum died of bowel cancer, my mum’s brother died from cancer in the liver, mum’s sister died from ovarian cancer and my mum’s other brother died from lung cancer. I have two children, they’re too young to be tested at the moment but that day will come.

“I waited seven months for my genetic counsellor; I don’t know why it took so long. At the appointment we discussed my family history and she said I most likely had Lynch syndrome. A blood sample was taken to confirm the syndrome but I had to chase and chase for over a year to get the results. I’m now waiting for a letter to invite me on to the aspirin trial and I think I will be chasing that up too.  Having bowel cancer is stressful enough and it’s not helpful having to chase and inform healthcare professionals about Lynch syndrome.

“More information needs to be provided to healthcare professionals about Lynch syndrome so it’s not the patient informing them.” Read more about Caroline’s story  

Deborah Alsina MBE, Chief Executive at Bowel Cancer UK, says:
“Until there is clear local and national leadership and a firm commitment to improve the services for people at high risk of developing bowel cancer, the estimated 175,000 people who carry this inherited faulty gene will continue to fall through the gaps of health bodies because they are reluctant to take responsibility.

For example in Wales and England the Breast Cancer Screening Programme has set a precedent for a national screening programme managing the surveillance of those with a known genetic mutation such as BRCA1 or 2 that increases the risk of cancer. A similar programme must now be introduced for those with Lynch syndrome. Until then generations of families will be devastated and lives needlessly lost.”

Dr Kevin Monahan, Consultant Gastroenterologist at West Middlesex University Hospital and a member of our medical advisory board, says:
“These latest findings give us an extremely valuable but also worrying insight into the challenges people with Lynch syndrome face.  With such a high risk of developing cancer, it’s vital this group is properly identified and managed by the health service in order to save as many lives as possible. We know in many areas of treatment and care too many people are being failed and this has to change.”

To address these issues, we have three top recommendations for a health body to implement:

 1. Develop a national registry of people identified as having Lynch syndrome

The UK’s understanding of the number of people with Lynch syndrome is limited – only 6,000 gene carriers are currently known, as testing is not carried out systematically across the country. By collecting anonymised data on gene carriers we can increase our knowledge and understanding of Lynch syndrome, including knowing how many people are affected and whether there are any regional differences in treatment, care and outcomes.

Our survey found that 87% of respondents identified with Lynch syndrome would consent to be part of a genetics registry if adopted in the UK to further research, raise awareness, coordinate consistent care services and to help others in the same situation.

2. Establish a national surveillance programme to improve the management of people with the genetic condition

By knowing if people have Lynch syndrome, the individual and their family can be offered a surveillance programme to receive regular colonoscopy, which can reduce their chance of dying from bowel cancer by 72 per cent. It will also reduce their risk of a recurrence of cancer, and inform treatment options.

Guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) recommend that people who have Lynch syndrome are placed in a surveillance programme to receive regular colonoscopy every 18 months to two years, depending on their risk. However, 49% told us in our survey they had experienced delays to their planned appointment date and 78% of these reported waiting more than six weeks beyond their planned procedure date.

The inequalities and postcode lottery of care caused by the current localised approach to surveillance of these high risk patients could be addressed by implementing a national surveillance programme, adopting a similar approach to the national bowel cancer screening programme. The national bowel cancer screening programme, aimed at the general popular aged over 60, provides an efficient high quality service with strict waiting time targets meaning patients are seen on time.

3. Develop comprehensive UK guidelines that set out best practice for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome

An inconsistent approach to managing people at higher risk of bowel cancer will undermine efforts to save lives from this treatable disease.

– See more at: https://www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk/media-centre/news-and-blog/families-devastated-by-cancer-as-health-bodies-pass-the-buck/#sthash.7VT0XGwc.dpuf

Test everyone with bowel cancer for Lynch syndrome, NICE urges


Anyone diagnosed with bowel cancer should be tested for the inherited genetic condition Lynch syndrome, recommends the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in draft guidance issued today.  We have worked with NICE to develop these new guidelines.

Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary bowel cancer and those affected run an increased risk of developing womb, ovarian and stomach cancer, among others.

Lynch syndrome accounts for approximately 3.3% (1 in 30) of bowel tumours, and is estimated to lead to over 1,100 colorectal cancers a year in the UK. An estimated 175,000 people in the UK have the syndrome, a large proportion of whom will be unaware that they have it.

Microsatellite instability (MSI) testing or immunohistochemistry should be used to detect abnormalities that might indicate the presence of the syndrome, recommends NICE.

If the result indicates abnormalities, further tests should be carried out to confirm the diagnosis. Diagnosing Lynch syndrome may also help guide choice of treatment for bowel cancer says NICE.

Testing everyone with bowel cancer will increase detection of the syndrome and identify families who could benefit from genetic testing for the condition. This could lead to closer monitoring and consequently better outcomes through earlier diagnosis and treatment, says NICE.

“While these tests have been available for a while, the committee heard that there is currently wide variation in the provision of testing for Lynch syndrome and other inherited colorectal cancers,” commented Professor Carole Longson, director of the centre for health technology assessment at NICE.

People with the syndrome who develop bowel cancer generally do so between the ages of 40-50 or younger.

However, said Professor Longson: “It is estimated by Bowel Cancer UK that only 50% of centres provide tests to assess the risk of Lynch syndrome in people diagnosed with colorectal cancer under the age of 50.”

She added: “The committee concluded that using these tests to assess the risk of Lynch syndrome in all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer could have substantial benefits for patients and their families.”

Deborah Alsina, Chief Executive, Bowel Cancer UK, agreed: “We hear every day how generations have been affected by cancer because of this genetic condition. By testing everyone diagnosed with colorectal cancer we can identify more people who have [it] and ensure they receive regular colonoscopy, which can reduce their chance of dying from bowel cancer by up to 72%.”

The consultation on the draft guidance runs until 11 November 2016.

New findings show variation of genetic testing in the UK could lead to cancer devastating whole families


Results of Bowel Cancer UK Study Released

bowelcancerukToday (Monday 8 August) along with the Royal College of Pathologists we have published findings which show that people under 50 diagnosed with bowel cancer are not being tested for Lynch syndrome – a genetic condition that increases the risk of bowel cancer by 80 per cent.

Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition which puts people at a much higher risk of developing bowel cancer as well as increasing the risk of other cancers including ovarian cancer, stomach cancer and womb cancer.

Lynch syndrome is estimated to cause 1,000 cases of bowel cancer each year, many of them under the age of 50. Yet fewer than five per cent of people with the condition have been identified.

The Royal College of Pathologists clinical guidelines state that a simple set of tests, which can help identify people with Lynch syndrome, should be carried out automatically on all people diagnosed with bowel cancer under the age of 50 at the time of diagnosis.

Performing this type of test can detect people at greater risk of recurrence, informs treatment options and helps identify those with family members who may also have the condition and be at risk of bowel cancer.  If you have Lynch syndrome there is a 50 per cent chance that your children, brothers and sisters also have the condition.

By knowing if people have Lynch syndrome, the patient and their family can be offered a surveillance programme to receive regular colonoscopy, which can reduce their chance of dying from bowel cancer by 72 per cent.

However, Bowel Cancer UK and the Royal College of Pathologists found that 29 per cent of hospitals across the UK do not test patients under 50 diagnosed with bowel cancer.

Of those that do carry out the test, only just over half (56 per cent) perform the test automatically as stated in the guidelines. In many cases, hospitals are even delaying the test until after treatment for bowel cancer with only one in 10 (11 per cent) testing prior to treatment.

Asha Kaur, Policy Manager at Bowel Cancer UK said: “Since we carried out the last Freedom of Information (FOI) request on this issue in 2015 there has been a 46 per cent increase in the number of hospitals testing those under 50 diagnosed with bowel cancer.

However, the guidelines have now been in place two years and there are still 40 hospitals in England alone not doing the test at all plus a huge variation in approach to testing across the UK.

We understand that a number of hospitals face challenges implementing the guidelines however many have developed innovative solutions and local approaches to overcome these barriers. Testing should be performed at diagnosis and that’s just not happening. We urge hospitals across the UK to work together to carry out this lifesaving test.

Lynch syndrome has a devastating effect on families and we hear every day how generations have been affected by cancer because of this genetic condition. But it doesn’t have to be this way. There is a simple and cost effective test that can detect Lynch syndrome and then place people in surveillance to help stop bowel cancer.”

Andy Sutton, father of Stephen Sutton who died at the age of 19 from bowel cancer and became a household name by raising millions for charity, said: “I know from personal experience how vital it is that every single person under 50 who is diagnosed with bowel cancer is offered testing for Lynch syndrome.  I was eventually offered it but only after I had been diagnosed with bowel cancer second time round. So I was pleased to hear that 110 out of 156 hospitals in the UK are now testing for Lynch syndrome, but I’d like to see every hospital doing it.”

Professor Tim Helliwell, Vice-President of The Royal College of Pathologists said: “We are pleased to see that most hospitals have followed the College’s guidelines and routinely make available the tests for Lynch syndrome. While we recognise that there are barriers for some Trusts in being able to routinely offer testing, we would encourage local multi-disciplinary teams and commissioners to work together to see if they can improve take up of this vital test which may affect patients and their families.”

Bowel cancer is the UK’s second biggest cancer killer and the fourth most common cancer. More than 2,400 people under 50 are diagnosed with bowel cancer in the UK every year. While this is only five per cent of people diagnosed with the disease, there has been a 25 per cent increase in the number of under 50s diagnosed in the past 10 years. Nationally, three out of five people diagnosed under the age of 50 will be diagnosed in the later stages of the disease when chances of survival are lower.

Bowel Cancer UK and the Royal College of Pathologists will be submitting the findings of this Freedom of Information request to The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) ahead of the publication of their guidance on testing for Lynch syndrome in October.

The charity’s work to to improve the identification and management of people diagnosed with Lynch syndrome is a core part of our flagship Never Too Young campaign.

(The findings are based on a Freedom of Information request which we submitted to 185 hospitals across the UK in May 2016. 156 hospitals (84%) responded.)

– See more at: https://www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk/media-centre/news-and-blog/new-findings-show-variation-of-genetic-testing-in-the-uk-could-lead-to-cancer-devastating-whole-families/#sthash.n4lYp5fw.dpuf

New survey for people with Lynch Syndrome in the UK


bowelcancerukBowel Cancer UK is campaigning to improve the identification and management of people with Lynch syndrome.

They’ve put together a 15 minute survey to give people the chance, anonymously, to share their experience of being diagnosed, and managed for Lynch syndrome.

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/lsexperience 

Your experiences will help Bowel Cancer UK to continue to campaign to improve the diagnosis and management of Lynch syndrome.

Please share the survey with your family and friends who also have Lynch syndrome.

Bowel Cancer UK research highlights variation in Lynch syndrome testing


BowelCancerUKHalf of NHS authorities in England, Scotland and Wales do not currently test bowel cancer patients under 50 for possible Lynch syndrome.

Read the data briefing here

 

Bowel Cancer UK concerned about wide variations in approach to testing for Lynch syndrome among hospitals that do test.

A Freedom of Information (FOI) request by leading charity Bowel Cancer UK has highlighted a wide  variation in tests for Lynch syndrome in bowel cancer patients under 50. Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition which can mean a higher risk of developing bowel cancer. Testing for Lynch syndrome will help identify family members who may have the condition and be at risk of bowel cancer. It can also affect treatment options. Lynch syndrome testing has been shown to be cost effective for the NHS, and is a required reflex test mandated by the Royal College of Pathologists and recommended by the British Society of Gastroenterologists.

Despite this testing is patchy. Just half of the hospital trusts in England that responded to the FOI request said they conduct tests among bowel cancer patients under 50 for Lynch syndrome, 10 of the trusts saying they had no plans to do so.

It’s not just England hospital trusts that are falling short.  More than half of health boards in Wales do not screen patients under 50 with bowel cancer. In Scotland fifty per cent of health boards currently do not follow the guidelines for Lynch syndrome testing set in July last year by the Royal College of Pathologists.  It’s a brighter picture in Northern Ireland where all health and social care trusts responded to say that they perform the test to identify possible Lynch syndrome patients.

The approach to testing is also widely varied among those hospitals which do screening for bowel cancer patients under 50. Testing is part of the core dataset for pathologists and should therefore be carried out automatically (known as reflex testing) for this group of young patients. However many trusts/health boards do not yet carry out this “reflex testing,” as stipulated in the Royal College of Pathologists’ guidelines.  Scotland is in the process of developing a nationwide approach to testing. We believe a nationwide approach would provide the consistency needed to ensure all bowel cancer patients under 50 are systematically tested.

Bowel Cancer UK submitted the FOI request in November 2014 to every NHS trust in England, health board in Scotland and health and social care trust in Northern Ireland to establish the number of trusts/health boards which were implementing the testing for all bowel cancer patients under 50, as mandated by the Royal College of Pathologists.  Lynch syndrome is responsible for around one in 12 cases of bowel cancer in people aged under 50.

Dr Suzy Lishman, President of the Royal College of Pathologists, said, “This research is encouraging as it shows that our guidelines may have had some impact already on testing for Lynch syndrome in patients diagnosed under the age of 50. However, there is considerable variation in the approach to testing.  Testing is now mandated by the Royal College of Pathologists as part of the core dataset for pathology and is a required reflex test for this group of young patients.  We would urge all trusts to perform the screening test for Lynch syndrome in bowel cancer patients under 50  and to adopt a more consistent approach to the testing.”

Deborah Alsina, Chief Executive of Bowel Cancer UK said, “We welcome the fact that some trusts and health bodies have implemented this guidance, but it is concerning that variation still remains. The disparity between hospital trusts and health boards in England, Wales and Scotland is even greater than we anticipated.”

“It’s crucially important that all bowel cancer patients under 50 are offered genetic testing at diagnosis as it could affect both surgical and chemotherapy decision making.   Yet currently it is normally done after treatment has ended, if at all.   Not only that, but appropriate surveillance needs to be arranged as patients with Lynch syndrome are at greater risk of recurrence.  Additionally, as Lynch syndrome is a genetic condition, it can have implications for other family members who may be at risk of developing bowel cancer so family members should also be tested to identify any others with the condition.”

Andy Sutton, the father of teenager Stephen Sutton who sadly died last year from bowel cancer, is all too aware of the need for systematic Lynch syndrome testing.  Andy was diagnosed with bowel cancer twice – in 1989 at the age of 31 and 20 years later in 2009.  It was only second time round that Andy was tested for Lynch syndrome, which was inherited by his son, Stephen.

Andy said, “If I had been genetically tested after the first diagnosis and given regular surveillance screening, it might have been possible to have prevented bowel cancer developing second time around.  That’s why I’m supporting Bowel Cancer UK’s call for everyone under the age of 50 who is diagnosed with bowel cancer to have testing for Lynch syndrome, it had a tragic impact on our family and I want to save others from going through the same experience.”

Dr Kevin Monahan, Consultant Gastroenterologist and General Physician, Family History of Bowel Cancer Clinic, West Middlesex University Hospital says: “Anyone under 50 who is diagnosed with bowel cancer is eligible for testing but it is not always offered. In the first instance, discuss testing for Lynch syndrome with your consultant or your GP”

Bowel Cancer UK is calling for urgent action to be taken:
1. We would urge NHS England and Wales to adopt a similar approach to NHS Scotland and establish a nationwide initiative to ensure a consistent, systematic approach to screening for Lynch syndrome as mandated by the Royal College of Pathologists.
2. All CCGs must commission to reflect the RCPath cancer dataset thus ensuring providers are compliant with this cancer dataset.
3. Accreditation of pathology departments should be linked to compliance with the core minimum dataset which may be used as a metric.

Survey of people diagnosed with bowel cancer under 50 years (from Bowel Cancer UK)


BowelCancerUK

The link to the survey is here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2GMH52K
 

Nearly two years ago Bowel Cancer UK launched the Never Too Young campaign to increase early diagnosis and improve treatment and support for people diagnosed with bowel cancer under the age of 50. Central to that work was a survey which helped understand the experiences of younger people with bowel cancer.  Some of the campaign successes so far include:

  • Securing funding from the Department of Health for a study at the University of Exeter to support GPs in identifying possible bowel cancer in younger people;
  • Guidance on bowel cancer in people under 50 being included for the first time in the new draft NICE guideline on referral for suspect cancer;
  • A quicker referral pathway for younger patients in Scotland being put into place;
  • Development of a new range of information specifically for younger bowel cancer patients to be launched soon;
  • Increasing interest and debate about bowel cancer in younger patients in the NHS (including amongst commissioners), academics and policy makers.  
  • Lynch syndrome testing to be rolled out at diagnosis for all under 50 patients.
  • A working group to be set up by Public Health England to look at surveillance screening of high risk groups including those with Lynch syndrome who often present under 50.  Progress is being made but clearly there is a long way to go.  Therefore in order to keep building the campaign, Bowel Cancer UK have just launched a new survey looking at what has changed for younger people with bowel cancer over the last two years.
If you have a moment, Bowel Cancer UK would be grateful if you could complete the survey here and share the link on social media if appropriate. It should take no longer than 15 minutes to complete, and your experiences will help Bowel Cancer UK continue to lead the change for everyone affected by bowel cancer.
 
Thanks again for your support.
 

Controversial 23andMe DNA test comes to UK


indexA personal DNA test that has sparked controversy in the US has been approved for use in the UK by regulators.

The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) says the 23andMe spit test, which is designed to give details about a person’s health risks based on their DNA, can be used with caution.

But critics say it may not be accurate enough to base health decisions on.

The company, California-based 23andMe, stands by its test.

Backed by Google, the firm offered US customers details of health risks based on gene variants they carry.

But in November 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned the company from marketing its service in the US, claiming 23andMe had failed to provide adequate information to support the claims it made about results.

A month later, the company stopped offering genetic tests related to health.

‘Think carefully’

An MHRA spokesperson said it regulated such tests in the UK to make sure they met minimum standards.

23andMe’s mission is to ensure that individuals can personally access, understand and benefit from the human genome”

Anne Wojcicki Chief executive, 23andMe

“People who use these products should ensure that they are CE marked and remember that no test is 100% reliable so think carefully before using personal genome services.

“If after using the service, you have any questions or concerns you should speak to your healthcare professional.”

She added: “If you are concerned that you have an incorrect result due to a faulty product, you can report this to MHRA at aic@mhra.gsi.gov.uk or 020 3080 7080.”

The UK Department of Health said it was behind the idea of using gene tests to guide patient care within the NHS, but echoed the MHRA advice on giving careful consideration before opting for services like the one offered by 23andMe.

23andMe chief executive Anne Wojcicki said: “The UK is a world leader in genomics and we are very excited to offer a product specifically for UK customers.”

Ms Wojcicki is separated from but still legally married to Sergey Brin, the co-founder of Google – which has invested millions in 23andMe.

The company had previously offered results on a customer’s risk for 254 diseases and conditions, including identifying genes linked to heart disease and breast cancer. There was also information on how individuals might respond to certain medicines.

Genetic testing is an important medical tool in certain situations, but for healthy people as a way to predict common complex diseases, it’s pretty useless”

Dr Marcy Darnovsky Center for Genetics and Society

But the FDA said the reliability of such tests had not been proven to its satisfaction. It was also worried that some customers could make life-changing decisions based solely on their results.

The UK Department of Health said the product launched in Britain was very different to the service halted by the US regulator.

“Many of the drug responses, inherited conditions and genetic health risks that were of concern in the US have been removed,” a spokesperson told BBC News.

In October, 23andMe said it would sell kits in Canada – these too contain only a handful of health-related results.

“I think a large part of it is trying to expand their markets,” said Professor Hank Greely, director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford University in California.

“They may also want to make it clear to the public, to their investors, to their employees that they’re alive and kicking.”

 

‘Understandable concern that this type of genetic testing’

23andMe said it does not share the genetic data with insurance companies or any other interested party without a person’s explicit consent.

“The science is soundest behind 23andMe’s ancestry reports, which are good, but the majority of the rest of the reports are generally based on very small shifts of risk, which are better served by simply living healthier and getting more exercise,” said Dr Ewan Birney – associate director of the EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute in Cambridge and unconnected with 23andMe, although he has used one of its kits.

“Despite 23andMe’s careful use of language and explanation, there is an understandable concern that this type of genetic testing could cause inappropriate harm simply through people worrying excessively or becoming neurotic over these small increases in risk.”

In the UK, 23andMe is not the first to launch genetic testing. The NHS’s 100,000 genome project conducts full genome sequencing as opposed to genotyping, whichcompares common differences in known genes. The NHS’s project, which is set to complete its pilot stage by 2017 as part of analysing how best to use genomic data in health care, is “world leading”, said Birney.

“This government is developing the use of genomics for patient care within the NHS,” a Department of Health spokesperson said. “We welcome initiatives that help to raise awareness of genomics and those which enable people to take more interest in their personal health but we urge people to think carefully before using private genomic services as no test is 100per cent reliable.”

“For the curious and the scientists, 23andMe is fine, it’s fun and you can have a ball with your ancestry, but for the general population the NHS is truly working out how best to use this in a way that is world leading,” said Birney. “If you’re waiting for the technology to catch up with you, the NHS will deliver.”

 

 

What’s the plan?

Dr Marcy Darnovsky, executive director of the Center for Genetics and Society in California, said the UK and Canadian launches could be a way of placing pressure on the FDA by demonstrating that regulators in other countries found no fault with their product.

“Genetic testing is an important medical tool in certain situations, but for healthy people as a way to predict common complex diseases, it’s pretty useless,” she told BBC News.

“Most complex diseases and almost all the common ones – with some exceptions such as the BRCA 1 and 2 genes (implicated in breast cancer) – are multi-factorial with many genes and other biological, social and environmental causes.”

What happens to the data gathered by 23andMe also concerns some people. “It’s not entirely clear what their business plan is – whether they want to make money by selling kits to consumers, or whether they want to make most of their money by selling consumer data to other companies,” Prof Greely told BBC News.

But Ms Wojcicki believes the information provided to customers is empowering. “23andMe’s mission is to ensure that individuals can personally access, understand and benefit from the human genome,” she said.

Commenting on the announcement, Mark Thomas, professor of evolutionary genetics at University College London, said: “For better or worse, direct-to-the-consumer genetic testing companies are here to stay.

“One could argue the rights and wrongs of such companies existing, but I suspect that ship has sailed.”

We support Lynch syndrome testing and bowel cancer in people under 50


https://i1.wp.com/www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk/media/414473/lynch_syndrome_and_bowel_cancer_november_2014.jpgBowel Cancer UK and clinical experts are urging all hospitals across the UK to implement Lynch syndrome testing at diagnosis for everyone with bowel cancer under the age of 50. Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition which causes over 1,000 cases of bowel cancer in the UK every year, many of them in people under the age of 50. However, fewer than 5% of people with Lynch syndrome in the UK have been diagnosed.

Testing everyone with bowel cancer under the age of 50 at diagnosis for Lynch syndrome will help identify family members who may carry Lynch syndrome and be at risk of bowel cancer. It has been shown to be cost effective for the NHS, and is recommended by the Royal College of Pathologists and British Society of Gastroenterologists. It is also a key recommendation in our Never Too Young campaign.

People with Lynch syndrome should then access regular surveillance screening, which can detect bowel cancer in the early stages and has been shown to reduce mortaility from bowel cancer by 72%.

Despite this, testing and surveillance screening are patchy across the UK. A letter in the Daily Telegraph (13 November 2014) from eight leading clinical experts supports our call for all hospitals to implement Lynch syndrome testing at diagnosis for people with bowel cancer under the age of 50.

The letter and signatories are as follows:

Dear Editor

There are more than 1,000 cases of bowel cancer a year that are attributable to Lynch syndrome (LS), many under the age of 50. LS is an inherited condition that predisposes individuals to bowel and other cancers, with a lifetime risk of around 70 per cent. Yet in the UK we have identified fewer than 5 per cent of families with LS. The family of Stephen Sutton, who was diagnosed with bowel cancer and whose father has LS, was one of them. It is a consistently under-recognised, under-diagnosed and inadequately treated condition.

Both the Royal College of Pathologists and the British Society of Gastroenterology recommend testing everyone with bowel cancer under the age of 50 at diagnosis to help us to identify family members who may carry LS and be at risk of bowel cancer. Yet testing is patchy. We urge all hospitals across the UK to implement this guidance.

This testing would mean people at risk could access surveillance programmes for regular colonoscopies, helping detecting bowel cancer early but also preventing it.

Patient groups such as Bowel Cancer UK are in support. A recent NHS study found that LS testing at diagnosis for everyone under 50 with bowel cancer would be cost effective enough to have been approved by NICE. The evidence is overwhelming. We must end this postcode lottery.

Dr Kevin Monahan, Consultant Gastroenterologist and General Physician at Family History of Bowel Cancer Clinic, West Middlesex University Hospital (WMUH), London

Professor Sue Clark, Chair of the Colorectal Section of the British Society of Gastroenterology, Consultant Colorectal Surgeon, St Mark’s Hospital

Professor John Schofield, Consultant Pathologist, Cellular Pathology Department, Maidstone Hospital and Kent Cancer Centre

Dr Suzy Lishman, President, The Royal College of Pathologists

Professor Ian Tomlinson, Professor of Molecular and Population Genetics, Group Head / PI and Consultant Physician, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics

Professor Huw JW Thomas, Consultant Gastroenterologist, Family Cancer Clinic, St Mark’s Hospital, London

Professor Malcolm Dunlop MD FRCS FMedSci FRSE, Colon Cancer Genetics Group and Academic Coloproctology, Head of Colon Cancer Genetics, Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine

Professor D Gareth Evans MD FRCP, Professor of Clinical Genetics and Cancer Epidemiology and Consultant Geneticist, University of Manchester

Commenting on the letter from clinical experts, Deborah Alsina, CEO of Bowel Cancer UK, said:

“The Royal College of Pathologists recently produced best practice guidelines recommending everyone with bowel cancer under the age of 50 should be tested for Lynch syndrome at diagnosis. Speedy implementation is vital as testing is currently patchy at best and if people are tested at all, it is often after treatment ends.  Yet a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can affect treatment decisions. We are therefore calling for all UK hospitals to implement this guidance swiftly.”

“This will also help to identify the risk to other family members who may also carry Lynch syndrome and who may be at higher risk of developing bowel cancer. Once identified, people at risk, including those diagnosed who have a greater chance of recurring or developing another linked cancer, should have access to surveillance programmes including regular colonoscopies. This will help to ensure bowel cancer is either prevented or detected early.”

Bowel Cancer UK will be writing to all Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Trusts in the UK asking them if they have implemented systematic Lynch syndrome testing, and we will report back on the responses. In the meantime, please share our infographic on the subject on social media to help raise awareness of the issue.

Inherited Colorectal Cancer Course for the Multidisciplinary Team, London 15th January 2015


 

Date: January 15th, 2015

Venue: St Mark’s Hospital, London

Click here for more information

Target Audience:  All members of the Colorectal Cancer MDT (nurse specialists, oncologists, gastroenterologists, colorectal surgeons, pathologists), Geneticists, genetics counsellors

Learning Style: Lectures and case discussions

Learning Outcomes: On completion of this course, attendees will:

  • Appreciate the contribution of inheritance to colorectal cancer
  • Be able to assess family history and associated risk
  • Understand how to manage individuals at moderate risk of colorectal cancer
  • Understand the basic features and management of polyposis syndromes
  • Understand the diagnosis and management of Lynch syndrome

Course Fees:

£150.00 – Consultants
£75.00 – Nurses, Trainees and other Healthcare Professionals

To apply, complete the application form and send to nwlh-tr.StMarksAcademicInstitute@nhs.net.

For further information, view the programme and brochure for the course. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Academic Institute.

Why do GPs fail to spot bowel cancer in young people like Stephen – until too late? (From the Daily Mail)


   Why do GPs fail to spot bowel cancer in young people like Stephen – until too late? (From the Daily Mail)

  • Stephen Sutton died after a four-year battle with bowel cancer
  • 19-year-old raised millions for the Teenage Cancer Trust before his death
  • Number of under-50s diagnosed is gradually rising to around 2,100 a year

By Judith Keeling

Hayley was 'too young' for bowel cancer to be considered

Hayley was ‘too young’ for bowel cancer to be considered

Hayley Hovey was 23 weeks’ pregnant with her first baby when she suddenly woke in the middle of the night with a sharp, shooting pain in her side.

She visited her GP’s out-of-hours service but was reassured to hear her baby’s heartbeat and be told all was well. The pain was probably ‘ligament strain’ caused by the weight of the growing baby. ‘I was ecstatic to be having a baby – I’ve always wanted to be a mum,’ says Hayley, 34. ‘All my scans showed my baby was healthy, so I didn’t think anything more about that pain.’

She now knows it was the first sign there was a grave threat to her baby’s life, and her own. Four weeks later her daughter, Autumn, was born prematurely and later died. Then Hayley was found to have bowel cancer.

Doctors now think Autumn’s death was linked to her mother’s cancer, with a blood clot breaking away from the tumour, damaging Hayley’s placenta and cutting off the food supply to her unborn baby.

However, it took four months after Autumn’s death for Hayley to be diagnosed. The problem was her age – she was ‘too young’ for bowel cancer to be considered.

Hayley, who lives in Fareham, Hants, with her husband Paul, a 35-year-old IT consultant, says: ‘Looking back, I had textbook symptoms – exhaustion, intermittent stomach pains, increasingly bad diarrhoea, blood in my stools and bleeding.

The disease is Britain’s second-biggest cancer killer, claiming 16,000 lives a year. The number of under-50s diagnosed has been gradually rising – to around 2,100 a year.

But a recent survey by the charity Bowel Cancer UK of patients under 50 found that 42 per cent of the women had visited their GP at least five times before being referred for tests.

Indeed, Hayley, a supply planner for an IT firm, was examined five times by different doctors and midwives, who all missed her symptoms, despite a golf ball-sized lump appearing on her stomach after her pregnancy. By the time she was diagnosed, Hayley had stage three to four cancer, meaning the tumour had broken through her bowel wall.

She had to undergo a seven-hour operation to remove the 6cm growth, followed by six months of chemo and radiotherapy.

 

But her experience is not uncommon, says Deborah Alsina, chief executive of Bowel Cancer UK: ‘We hear from many younger people who express frustration at not getting a diagnosis and support.’

‘Bowel cancer is often associated with older patients over 50 – but younger people can, and do, regularly get it, as the tragic story of Stephen Sutton recently highlighted,’ adds Kevin Monahan,  consultant gastroenterologist at West Middlesex University Hospital, London.

Stephen Sutton, 19, raised more than £3million during his three-year battle against multiple tumours

Stephen Sutton, 19, raised more than £3million during his three-year battle against multiple tumours

 

Stephen Sutton, the 19-year-old fundraiser who died last week from the disease, told the Mail earlier this month of his anger that he was not diagnosed for six months after his symptoms started. This was despite his family history of Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that raises the risk of bowel cancer.

‘If it had been caught earlier, it could have led to a better prognosis,’ he said. Hayley, too, eventually discovered she had Lynch syndrome.

Bowel cancer is very treatable if detected early – 93 per cent of patients who are found to have a small tumour on the bowel wall  live for five years or more. Yet only 9 per cent of cases are diagnosed at this stage – most are diagnosed at stage three. So, the overall five-year survival rate for bowel-cancer patients is just 54 per cent.

Because patients and many doctors assume that young people won’t get bowel cancer, they are particularly likely to have advanced-stage tumours at the time of diagnosis.

What to watch for

Bleeding or blood in faeces

A change in bowel habits lasting more than three weeks

Exhaustion

Unexplained weight loss

Abdominal pain

See bowelcanceruk.org.uk; beatingbowelcancer.org (phone 08450 719 301); and familyhistorybowelcancer.wordpress.com/

Cancer charities are campaigning to improve diagnosis for all ages – they want new diagnostic guidelines for GPs and earlier screening procedures.

Sean Duffy, NHS England’s national clinical director for cancer, says: ‘The UK lags behind much of Europe in terms of survival from bowel cancer. We need to change this, and this includes identifying it better in patients under 50.’

National GP guidelines state only patients aged 60 and over should be automatically referred to hospital for tests if they have one symptom. Patients aged 40 to 60 must exhibit two or more symptoms.

For under 40s, there is often an assumption the symptoms must be something else, says Mark Flannagan, chief executive of the charity Beating Bowel Cancer. ‘We’ve had patients with red-flag symptoms – such as blood in their stools – being told “you’ve got IBS” or “you’re too young to have cancer” by their GPs.’

Four weeks after Hayley’s initial scare, she was unable to feel her baby moving. Tests revealed Autumn had stopped growing, and she had to be delivered by emergency caesarean. After her birth, in July 2011, she was taken to a specialist neo-natal unit at Southampton General Hospital but died in hospital a few weeks later.

Two weeks afterwards, Hayley experienced more shooting pains. With her pregnancy bump gone, there was also a noticeable lump on the side of her waist. Her midwife said it was probably an infection, and Hayley was given antibiotics.

But her health deteriorated rapidly and she had to take six weeks off work with exhaustion, which her GP put down to depression.

Within three months of Autumn’s death, Hayley was suffering from nausea and abdominal pain.

Unable to get a GP’s appointment, she went to A&E but was told the lump was possibly an infection related to her caesarean. Doctors performed a cervical smear test (which was subsequently lost) and sent her home with paracetamol.

Stephen Sutton with his mother Jane whilst Prime Minister David Cameron visited him

Stephen Sutton with his mother Jane whilst Prime Minister David Cameron visited him

‘I got the impression they didn’t take me very seriously,’ she recalls.

Soon after, she was vomiting up to ten times a day, feeling dizzy and weak, passing blood and experiencing chronic diarrhoea. At an emergency GP appointment, she was examined by a different doctor who immediately referred her to hospital; after several days of tests, she was diagnosed with cancer.

Four days before Christmas, Hayley underwent surgery. ‘We thought we’d be enjoying our first Christmas as a family, but instead I was in hospital, grieving for the loss of our little girl and terrified about the future,’ she recalls. ‘My treatment might have been less of an ordeal if my cancer had been picked up sooner. It makes me quite angry to think if I’d been 60, it would have been picked up more quickly.’

But even obvious symptoms are often missed by doctors, says Mr Flannagan. ‘I am not blaming GPs, but we need to not be shy of pointing out where things are going wrong. The default position should be for a GP to rule out cancer, just to be safe.’

‘It can also be problematic if patients don’t have obvious symptoms such as bleeding’, says Dr Monahan. ‘They may instead have vaguer symptoms such as tiredness, unexplained weight loss or abdominal pain, which could be attributed to being symptoms of other conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome or Crohn’s disease.’

Public awareness is also an issue. A survey in March by health insurer AXA PPP found nearly half of men couldn’t name one symptom of bowel cancer.

Indeed, Martin Vickers, 49, had never heard of it before his diagnosis in 2008. ‘I was totally shocked,’ says the father of four, who lives in Burton-on-Trent with wife Andrea, 48. ‘I didn’t know bowel cancer existed. It was hugely traumatic.’

Martin visited his GP five times in nine months with extreme tiredness and loose stools. His symptoms were attributed to stress – his mother had recently died and he has a high-pressure job as head of capital investment for Cambridge and South Staffordshire Water – and then IBS.

Joining friends and family to complete a Guinness Book of Records challenge creating hearts with hands

Joining friends and family to complete a Guinness Book of Records challenge creating hearts with hands

 

‘But I knew something wasn’t right,’ says Martin. ‘It was instinctive.’ He was finally diagnosed with stage three bowel cancer in November 2008, after his GP did an internal examination and felt a lump.

Martin underwent three months of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, followed by surgery, another six months of chemotherapy and a second operation. He now has to use a colostomy bag but has been in remission for five years.

Currently, screening is only available to people aged 60-plus. They are sent home tests, which involve sending a stool sample to a lab. But the Department of Health is now looking at a new procedure, bowel scope screening, which involves a partial colonoscopy -examining only the lower bowel.

A major UK trial of 55 to 64 year olds showed that people screened this way were 43 per cent less likely to die from bowel cancer, and 33 per cent less likely to develop it.

 

Beating bowel cancer – The bottom line

This is because the procedure is usually successful at detecting small growths known as polyps, which can become cancerous.

The screening – which would be offered to everyone aged 55 and over – is now being piloted. Campaigners hope it will be made available nationally by 2016.

‘This is a really important development and should make a big difference to bowel cancer outcomes,’ says Dr Monahan, who runs the Family History of Bowel Cancer clinic at West Middlesex University Hospital, specialising in hereditary components of the disease.

It won’t, however, help younger patients such as Hayley. Before her chemotherapy, she and Paul had nine embryos frozen via IVF. However she is worried she may pass on Lynch syndrome, so the couple are considering what to do.

But she says: ‘I am still here, I have a life ahead of me – and I hope my story will help others to be diagnosed in time.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2633287/Why-GPs-fail-spot-bowel-cancer-young-people-like-Stephen-late.html#ixzz32TNCY2Lm

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