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Inherited Colorectal Cancer Course for the Multidisciplinary Team, London 15th January 2015


 

Date: January 15th, 2015

Venue: St Mark’s Hospital, London

Click here for more information

Target Audience:  All members of the Colorectal Cancer MDT (nurse specialists, oncologists, gastroenterologists, colorectal surgeons, pathologists), Geneticists, genetics counsellors

Learning Style: Lectures and case discussions

Learning Outcomes: On completion of this course, attendees will:

  • Appreciate the contribution of inheritance to colorectal cancer
  • Be able to assess family history and associated risk
  • Understand how to manage individuals at moderate risk of colorectal cancer
  • Understand the basic features and management of polyposis syndromes
  • Understand the diagnosis and management of Lynch syndrome

Course Fees:

£150.00 – Consultants
£75.00 – Nurses, Trainees and other Healthcare Professionals

To apply, complete the application form and send to nwlh-tr.StMarksAcademicInstitute@nhs.net.

For further information, view the programme and brochure for the course. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Academic Institute.

Diet & bowel cancer risk in Lynch syndrome


coverAnalysis from a recent study has found that loading up on snack foods may increase cancer risk in individuals with an inborn susceptibility to colorectal and other cancers. Published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that an eating pattern low in snack foods could help these individuals — who have a condition called Lynch syndrome — lower their risk.

Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by a high risk of developing colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other cancers at an early age. The syndrome is caused by mutations in genes involved with repairing DNA within cells.

Numerous studies have investigated associations between certain foods and colorectal cancer, and now there is general agreement that red and processed meats and alcohol consumption can increase individuals’ risk. Only a few studies have evaluated lifestyle factors and colorectal cancer in patients with Lynch syndrome, though. To investigate, Akke Botma, PhD, MSc, of the Wageningen University in the Netherlands, and her colleagues collected dietary information from 486 individuals with Lynch syndrome. During an average follow-up of 20 months, colorectal polyps (precancerous lesions) were detected in 58 people in the study.

“We saw that Lynch syndrome patients who had an eating pattern with higher intakes of snack foods — like fast food snacks, chips, or fried snacks — were twice as likely to develop these polyps as Lynch syndrome patients having a pattern with lower intakes of snack foods,” said Dr. Botma.

The findings suggest that certain dietary patterns have an influence on the development of polyps in individuals with Lynch syndrome. “Unfortunately, this does not mean that eating a diet low in snack foods will prevent any polyps from developing, but it might mean that those Lynch syndrome patients who eat a lot of snack foods might have more polyps than if they ate less snack foods,” said Dr. Botma. Because the study is observational, other studies are needed to confirm the results.

Previous work from the group revealed that smoking and obesity may also increase the risk of developing colorectal polyps among individuals with Lynch Syndrome. Thus, even though they may have inherited a very high risk of developing cancer, it may be possible to affect this risk by adopting a healthy lifestyle, including a healthy diet.

Akke Botma, Hans F. A. Vasen, Fränzel J. B. van Duijnhoven, Jan H. Kleibeuker, Fokko M. Nagengast and Ellen Kampman. Dietary patterns and colorectal adenomas in Lynch syndrome : The GEOLynch Cohort Study. Cancer, 2012; DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27726

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Lifestyle and bowel cancer risk

Mom, Dad, Let’s Talk about Colon Cancer


American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mom, Dad, Let’s Talk about Colon Cancer

ACS Blog

By Durado Brooks, MD

How often do you think a family conversation about cancer occurs? The truth is, not nearly often enough.

Colorectal cancer (often called simply “colon cancer”) is cancer that develops in the colon or the rectum, and it’s the third most common cancer in the U.S. While most people diagnosed with colon cancer do not have a family history the disease, people who have this cancer in their family have a significantly higher chance of being diagnosed. The good news is that colon cancer is one of the most preventable cancers, and this prevention can work even for people who are at high risk of the disease.

Colon cancer is preventable because it usually starts as a non-cancerous growth called a polyp. Not all polyps will progress to cancer, but for those that do the transformation usually takes a number of years. Cancer can be prevented by finding and removing these polyps with colon cancer screening tests during this transition period.

People who have a history of colon cancer or polyps in a close family member (parent, sibling, or child) may have twice the risk of developing the disease compared to those with no family history. This is especially true if cancer appears in the relative before age 60. If there are multiple family members with colon cancer, the risk may be even higher.

Polyp detection and removal is best accomplished by regular screening – recommended to start at age 50 for people at average risk for developing colon cancer. However, screening recommendations may be quite different for those with an affected relative. That’s why it’s so important to know your family history. Simply knowing that a relative had “cancer” is not sufficient; you need to know details:

Where did the cancer start? Cancer of the colon is very different than cancer that starts in the stomach.

How old was the relative was when cancer was diagnosed? Colon cancer diagnosed in an 80- year-old grandmother may not imply that the family is at higher risk, particularly if this is the only case in the family.

Family history is an important predictor of many cancers (colon, breast, prostate), as well as other diseases (diabetes, hypertension, heart disease). Many people don’t appreciate the increased risk associated with a family history of these diseases, but this knowledge could be life-saving for you or for someone you love. The American Cancer Society and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable have developed FamilyPLZ.org to spark these discussions. FamilyPLZ provides tips, tools, and resources to educate the public on the importance of family health history, help people gather this critical information, and share it within their family and with their doctors.

So while these are not easy conversations, they are definitely worth having.

Dr. Brooks is director of prostate and colorectal cancers for the American Cancer Society.

via Mom, Dad, Let’s Talk about Colon Cancer.

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